Chamber Singers head to High Museum

Posted on October 27, 2014

“ Make A Joyful Noise ” : Renaissance Art and Music from Florence Cathedral KEY IMAGES AND CREDITS 9.9.14 LP High - resolution images can be found here: U: \ della Robbia \ Images \ KEY IMAGES ART59339 Luca della Robbia (Italian, 1399/1400 - 1482) Trumpeters and Young Girls Dancing , 1431 - 1438 Marble 40 x 37 in. From the Museo dell'Opera del Duomo, Florence Photo: Scala / Art Resource, NY

Luca della Robbia (Italian, 1399/1400-1482)
Trumpeters and Young Girls Dancing (detail)
1431-1438  Marble 40 x 37 in.
From the Museo dell’Opera del Duomo, Florence
Photo: Scala / Art Resource, NY

The Erskine Chamber Singers will perform at the High Museum in Atlanta Friday, Oct. 31 at 7 p.m. as part of “Make a Joyful Noise”: Renaissance Art and Music at Florence Cathedral, an exhibit that will include three marble panels created by sculptor Luca della Robbia (1400-1482) for the cantoria, or singing gallery, of the cathedral.

The panels illustrate the text of Psalm 150, depicting children singing, dancing, and playing musical instruments. Hand-decorated choir books and a lectern designed to display them will accompany the panels. Music from the choir books will be performed on the audio tour that is part of the exhibit.

Live concerts by professional musicians, church choirs, and school groups, including the Chamber Singers, will be scheduled in an adjoining gallery throughout the duration of the exhibit, which runs from Oct. 25 to Jan. 11.

Erskine’s Director of Choral Activities, Assistant Professor of Music Dr. Mark Nabholz, said the program will consist of madrigals from the Renaissance to the 20th century, with selections by Palestrina, Josquin des Prez, Ravenscroft, and William T. Allen, a New York-based living composer.

Members of the Chamber Singers this year are sopranos Sally Caldwell, Cali Colbert, and Lynn Donnegan; altos Lydia Clarke, Heather Endicott, and Bradejah Thomas; tenors Christian Beamguard, Nathan Holben, and Will Unthank; and basses Patrick Crump, Kurt Widenhouse, and Philip Wood.

See more information about the exhibit and the High Museum here.